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Picture of William Heisel
Recent stories from the New York Times and the Washington Post encapsulate why language choices are so important for responsible reporting on addiction.
Picture of Rebecca Plevin
The Los Angeles Department of Health Services will start approving hepatitis C drugs for active IV drug users. Until now, the department had withheld approval for anyone who had not been drug-free for at least six months.
Picture of Liza Gross
California's psychiatric hospitals can be highly dangerous places, both for patients and staff. Lost work days and overtime pay are huge. But reporters looking to track down reliable data on assaults face an uphill climb.
Picture of Angela Naso
“Welcome to NAMI en español,” says Pedro Arciniega, in Spanish, before an audience of more than 35 participants who were crammed into a room to attend a month meeting to hear about one young man’s journey who struggles with a severe mental illness.
Picture of Deepa Bharath
The shocking call came a decade ago from campus police at UC Berkeley. Kwang Ho Kim's son, a straight-A student, had dumped all his clothes on the bed and set them on fire.
Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

Comparing HIV-prevention efforts in three California counties reveals the complexities involved in trying to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS once and for all.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Calif.’s revised eligibility rules for new hep C drugs appear to be easing Medicaid patients’ access to the medications, yet the vast majority of Medicaid patients with hep C still aren't getting the costly drugs, state health officials say.

Picture of Ryan White

Amid rising awareness of maternal depression's harmful effects on children, CMS is telling states they can bill mom's screening and treatment to the child's Medicaid coverage.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

When extremely expensive new hepatitis C medications arrived on the market more than two years ago, private health insurers limited access to the very sickest. Now, two new analyses say that approach is shortsighted and counterproductive.

Picture of Lisa Pickoff-White

“We were really struck by the fact that people were incredibly acute in their need,” a disability rights attorney said after touring Sonoma County's main jail. “Higher than we’ve seen in units that are licensed designated hospital units. Something was wrong here.”

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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