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uninsured

Picture of Daniel Chang

Despite the numbers of Floridians stranded in a health policy no man’s land – earning too much for Medicaid but not enough for subsidies – the “coverage gap” was getting little attention from policymakers and media. A reporter at the Miami Herald set out to change that, by telling their stories.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

Facing a $55-million deficit during the Great Recession, Sacramento County officials made a choice: To save money, they would close their free health clinics to people who entered the country illegally. Six years later, they want to reverse that decision.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

For uninsured California immigrants, which side of a county line they live can significantly affect the care available when they're sick. And Obamacare reforms are complicating choices for local officials as they consider what, if any, healthcare should be provided for the remaining uninsured.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

I was nervous about the final story in my series from the start, since I'd need to feature someone who fell into the large group of “other” uninsured. Finding such a source would take me down a lot of dead ends before I finally got a solid lead and, ultimately, an amazing source.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

A key goal of health reform has been to get insured individuals to seek out primary care rather than the ER. In the Bay Area, safety net systems are trying new approaches to funnel more patients into primary care, including putting nurses in firehouses.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

Undocumented immigrants in California are expected to remain uninsured, regardless of the health care reform. Lawmakers seek solutions to close the gap. 

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

Despite the Affordable Care Act, there are still millions of Californians without health insurance. Undocumented immigrants don’t qualify for Obamacare benefits, while many others find coverage still too expensive or face other obstacles in enrolling.

Picture of Amanda Ramirez

The basics of the healthcare system and medical insurance coverage and the effect it may have on Latinos' participation in the Affordable Care Act's marketplace.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

Although safety net institutions continue to serve millions of uninsured, they are facing changes brought on by the health law. Since Affordable Care Act enrollment started last fall, Centro Medico clinic in Southern California is getting up to 10 new patients a day.

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

In California, Certified Enrollment Counselors fill a role under the Affordable Care Act similar to the one that’s often described as a “navigator” on a national level. But under Covered California, CECs and navigators are not the same thing.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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