Skip to main content.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why don't Valentine's Day hearts look like actual human hearts? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why are taxpayers footing the bill for a Florida man's medical marijuana? Answers and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of John  Sepulvado

California regulators stop monitoring PCBs in the air at the Kettleman Hills Facility, then birth defects increase in Kettleman City, then regulators start monitoring, and birth defects go down.

Picture of John  Sepulvado

Kettleman City has a toxic PCB dump problem, or at least so says the U.S. Enivornmental Protection Agency. From the release:

Picture of Roseann Langlois

Exposure to radon in the home is responsible for an estimated 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In South Lake Tahoe, more than half of the homes contain toxic levels of the colorless, odorless and tasteless gas.

The dangers and causes of radon in our region are well known. Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. It is also naturally occurring throughout our area due to the granite that dominates our landscape.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

An infectious disease spread to humans by mosquitoes that have bitten infected birds, West Nile virus historically was seen only in Africa, Europe and Asia before it was first detected in the United States in 1999. Though the majority of those infected show no symptoms, the disease can be deadly, particularly in the elderly. If West Nile virus enters the brain, it can cause encephalitis or meningitis. The major way to prevent infection is to avoid mosquitoes and to reduce mosquitoes in populated areas. Updated June 2010

Picture of William Heisel

Andrew Schneider is one of the country's most accomplished investigative journalists. His work has won not just one, but two Pulitzer Prizes, and countless other awards. I had the privilege of meeting him when both of us were finalists for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting at Harvard. My team lost. So did his.

Picture of Admin User

Richard M. Gersberg is head of the division of environmental health at SDSU's Graduate School of Public Health. He is also director of the Coastal and Marine Institute at SDSU and principal investigator of SDSU's California Distance Learning Health Network, an organization that uses the latest in technology to provide continuing education to professional health workers. Gersberg specializes in water quality research and limnology, and has broad experience working with both chemical and microbiological pollutants and risk assessments. He has over 50 scientific publications in these areas.

Pages

Announcements

The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth