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U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

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Dr. Adam Zolotor thinks physicians should diagnose prostate cancer based on symptoms rather than screening. "I would pose to you that a usual source of care and a trusted physician or health care provider is the No. 1 thing we can do to get men diagnosed earlier and treated earlier," he said.

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Steven Patierno, deputy director of the Duke Cancer Institute, disagrees withe the decision that screening is not helpful. He says the guidelines don't take into account prostate cancer's slow-growing nature.

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Innovative health reforms in Oregon, new recommendations on hormones for women, an intensive treatement for hypertension, the spread of Chagas disease and more from our Daily Briefing.

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Drug abuse, genetic disease clusters, mammography, comparison hospital shopping and more from our Daily Briefing.

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I just posted the story that I wrote for The Center for Public Integrity, which focuses on how much money Medicare spends on unnecessary cancer screenings. It was a fascinating reporting journey and one that you may be able to partially replicate, as the debate heats up about the necessity of prostate cancer screening tests.

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An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

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Did a federal task force ignore evidence that more frequent mammograms save lives? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Join Dr. Robert Smith with the American Cancer Society and Dr. Chris Flowers with UCSF to discuss the science behind the new U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. Log on at www.contracostatimes.com.

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COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

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