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Picture of Gergana Koleva

The American Red Cross, the largest supplier of donated blood in the U.S., was fined $9.6 million after federal inspectors found hundreds of blood safety violations at 16 of the organization’s 36 blood collection centers nationwide.

Picture of Kathryn Canavan

When eighth-grader Courtney White goes on sleepovers, she totes the blanket that a funeral home gave her to commemorate her big brother, who was shot to death.

Picture of Joy Horowitz

Recent studies have found statistical links between pesticide use and an outbreak of Parkinson's disease in California farm towns. Researchers even know which chemicals are the likely culprits. What's the government doing about it? Not much.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

New medical ethics on health costs, a failed biomed research center, and key 2012 dates for health reform, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Three out of four Americans want government to do something to curb overuse of antibiotics on animal farms that supply most of the nation’s meat, and many believe the resulting rise of antibiotic-resistant superbugs is a serious threat to human health, Gergana Koleva reports.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

A first-of-its-kind class action lawsuit filed against a New York dentist is bringing to light a dubious tactic some medical doctors employ to protect their reputations.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A moving examination of how doctors choose to die, a big-money Prempro lawsuit, and FDA scrutiny of the HCG diet, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Yvonne LaRose

One of the things on my agenda for October 20 was getting to an appointment on time. The other was going to the Los Angeles Sports Arena to see how the CareNowUSA.org free health clinic was progressing and what the faces of those being served. But at 5 PM, I was on a bus and trying to get home. I

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