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Picture of William Heisel

Can eating too many desserts cause diabetes? Yes. Is a Burger King advertising campaign to blame? That’s a tougher call, one that few reporters have tried to answer.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

How does a new park in Culver City become a destination, while the urban trail of Stocker Corridor is overlooked by many of its own nearby residents?

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

There are a lot reasons to head to South Los Angeles and hiking probably isn't at the top of your list. As home to nearly one million people, the region is one of the densest areas, but also the most park poor. There are 92 parks and recreation areas in South Los Angeles totaling about 1,200 acres. That translates to 1.2 acres for every 1,000 people, significantly less than the national standard of 6 acres. Of what's available, here are a handful of accessible areas of significant size that offer a chance to get back to nature and beauty within the city -- with a physical challenge, of course.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

Picture of Tracy Wood

Orange County Supervisor Janet Nguyen said numerous complaints spurred her to propose changes to the CalOptima board. Yet records show only five from all supervisors and other top elected officials in four months.

Picture of Tracy Wood

CalOptima is Orange County's system for managing Medi-Cal. With no warning, one county supervisor tried to push through major changes that shifted control of the $1.3 billion program.

Picture of Sandy Kleffman

Some non-profit hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area receive millions of dollars in tax breaks each year to care for the poor and uninsured, yet they provide only a fraction of local charity care. Sandy Kleffman reports.

Picture of Damien Newton

At the first meeting of my fellow fellows, we were asked a simple question, "do you consider yourself a journalist?" My answer at the time was, "no." My answer today would be different.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Journalist-blogger Isabelle Walker provides an in-depth look at what happens to homeless people who get seriously ill. Where can they go to recover?

Picture of Kristen Natividad

This week, KQED is seeking citizen journalists in various cities to report on the health issues that plague their communities. Also, note that applications for the Health Journalism Fellowships presented by the Association of Health Care Journalists & Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are due in one week. As always, find the latest in health jobs, workshops and more.

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The nation's top infectious disease specialist will join us for a conversation with national health reporter Dan Diamond of The Washington Post. We’ll talk about the evolving threat posed by monkeypox, the current state of the COVID pandemic, and broader lessons on how we respond to emerging diseases. Sign-up here!

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