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Picture of Liza Gross

Where you live—and who you are—plays a big part in how long you’ll live. If you live in poverty in California’s San Joaquin Valley, and you're Latino, you’re twice as likely to die prematurely as someone who is white and lives in an upper-class community.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

In Michigan, companies have begun to recover, businesses are hiring and the economy is humming again. But recovery has remained elusive for many families whose struggles have been exacerbated by severe cuts to social safety nets, education and social programs.

Picture of Mikaela Conley

“HIV is the face of the forgotten people in this country,” Dr. Carlos Del Rio, an Atlanta-based AIDS expert, told me last February. Nevertheless, there continue to be "hot spots” where the disease thrives. Those areas are some of the most impoverished parts of major cities in the U.S.

Picture of Sandra Hausman

The plight of prisoners in California has received extensive coverage since a class action lawsuit alleged bad medical care behind bars violated the U.S. Constitution. In Virginia, however, there has been little reporting on the quality of health care for about 31,000 people in state prisons.

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

Texas is fertile ground for debate on women’s health issues, as the national attention on state Sen. Wendy Davis’s recent filibuster of controversial regulations revealed. What's ahead for family planning services in the state and the women who depend on the programs?

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

One billion dollars a year could be saved a year if Medicare adopted the VA's prescribing habits, according to a recent paper in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Picture of Anthony Advincula

Diabetes-related deaths have reached an all-time high in New York City, and communities of color are being hit the hardest.

Picture of Taunya English

Many higher-priced properties offer smoke-free apartments, now, that amenity is available to some public housing residents.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

You know things are bad in the pork industry when the whistleblowers aren't animal rights activists but the government itself. In May, the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Office of the Inspector General exposed extreme sanitation and humane violations in 30 swine slaughterhouses it visited.

Picture of Susan  Abram

The Affordable Care Act is stirring up confusion and anger among the patients who visit a Los Angeles clinic dedicated to serving urban-based Native Americans. That's because President Barack Obama's reform has raised a painful question: which tribes get free health care and which have to pay?

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2021 Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporters Kathleen McGrory and Neil Bedi will explain how they unearthed a secretive policing operation in Florida that used data to harass residents and profile schoolchildren. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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