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This week, KQED is seeking citizen journalists in various cities to report on the health issues that plague their communities. Also, note that applications for the Health Journalism Fellowships presented by the Association of Health Care Journalists & Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are due in one week. As always, find the latest in health jobs, workshops and more.

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An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

Picture of Kristen Natividad

Southern California Reporting on Health readers, take note of an exciting workshop taking place in Los Angeles next weekend. Spend a day with the National Association of Black Journalists and hear from local journalists about how to improve the news coverage of health issues.

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Oakland's superintendent doesn't just want to close schools. He wants to radically alter how the school district and the city educate kids.

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Is Oklahoma headed toward a crisis in access to health care? Health experts say yes -- for many reasons. This three-part series takes a look at the problems, how it affects all Oklahomans and what can be done to change it.

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The first in a three part series on the causes behind Oklahoma's lack of access to health care, including a physician shortage, geographic disparities and lack of transportation options.

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Every once in a while, a story not only finds a reporter, it hounds her. That was the case with my new book about two friends who blew the whistle on one of the deadliest prescription drugs in U.S. history.

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Can you change healthcare in just 28 hours? Can a team of programmers save lives and change the world? Check out their worthy attempts from the Health 2.0 Code-a-thon.

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By its own admission, Glendale was in desperate need for a new approach to transportation planning. The unintended consequences of a transportation network that emphasized moving cars can be seen in the statistics.

Part 1: Glendale Invests in Safe and Healthy Streets for a Safe and Healthy Future

Part 2: The Embedded Activist

Part 3: Second Steps: The Riverdale-Maple Greenway Will Connect Parks in Glendale

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A formerly sickly child, West Virginia's top health official finds himself in the position to affect the health of more than 400,000 West Virginians enrolled in Medicaid, DHHR's biggest program.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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