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Picture of William Heisel

Why are state medical boards disciplining doctors by sending them to work in prisons? Why are some prison doctors with troubled histories kept away from patients - yet still collect their salaries? Learn how to report on these issues in your community.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Fast food and food stamps, cutbacks in worker safety programs, Jerry's Kids loses Jerry and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The latest on a national salmonella outbreak, rising Medicare and Medicaid costs and good news for some Californians with expensive health insurance, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Erin Marcus

Sometimes, the simplest tools in medicine are the ones that give us the most useful information. Take the humble blood pressure machine, for example. It's been around for years, and it's cheap, compared with a lot of other medical devices. It's simple to use, and it doesn't require a medical or a nursing degree to operate. But the numbers it reports are valuable in helping predict a person's risk of a host of medical problems, including heart failure, stroke and kidney failure, and can help doctors determine whether a person really needs to take medicine to control his or her high blood pressure.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Journalist Emily Ramshaw gives the backstory on how she reported her ground-breaking series on Texas' colonias, impovershed neighborhoods that remain without running water, paved roads or electricity after decades of neglect.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

If communities build access to healthy foods, will residents come? The evidence is mixed.

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Californians are required to disclose the radon level in their home, if known, before transferring it to a new owner. Nevadans are not. In both states, renters are particularly vulnerable. "There are no regulations to protect renters from radon in Nevada," said Susan Howe, radon education program director for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. "There are no regulations dealing with radon in Nevada, period. There are no laws to protect people when they buy or build homes."

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

As a National Health Journalism fellow, I will be examining the obstacles to healthy eating for low-income black families in Boston. Specifically, I will focus on the obstacles of food pricing, food access, and the “business of unhealthiness,” the web of market incentives that drive individuals towards unhealthy food choices. In addition, I will also examine the creative solutions local activists devise to overcome these barriers to a nutritious diet.

Picture of William Heisel

When investigative health journalist Marshall Allen told me that my anti-FOIA stance seemed counterproductive, I listened. Here's his compelling argument.

Picture of Kristen Natividad

This week, we highlight a Healthcare Research Writer-Editor vacancy at Thomson Reuters. Also featured are a variety of print and online opportunities on the East Coast. In addition, find the most updated information on upcoming grants, fellowships and educational opportunities.

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Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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