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Carbon dioxide gets most of the public attention as the main driver of climate change, a serious and increasing threat to public health worldwide.
But “black carbon” or “soot” emitted from diesel engines, cook stoves, brick kilns, agricultural burning and other sources in the developing and developed world poses a serious health risk for people especially in south and east Asia.

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Getting ready for a huge study of the Gulf oil spill's affects on human health, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Making smokers pay $1 more per pack for cigarettes would help West Virginia save lives, rein in medical costs and could raise revenue for substance-abuse services, public health advocates told lawmakers Wednesday.

UPDATE: The state Legislature did not pass the bill this year.

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Treatment centers such as Chad's Hope in Clay County aim to help get prescription drug addicts back on track. This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

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West Virginia officials say they're disappointed that Florida's governor wants to kill a planned prescription drug monitoring program in the Sunshine State, which is a destination for people who deal pills.

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West Virginia children with autism would have a much easier time getting treatment under legislation passed Thursday by the House of Delegates. 

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West Virginia smokers would pay $1 more per pack in taxes under a bill state lawmakers are considering.

Picture of Emily Hagedorn

Bell County in southeastern Kentucky currently has the eighth worst prescription drug death rate in the nation. Victims are citizens of every economic level, and the effects are hurting innocent people.

This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug costs continue to climb for West Virginia, despite efforts to rein them in.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

West Virginia's two Republican U.S. representatives voted with GOP colleagues Wednesday to overturn federal health care reform.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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