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Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Cartoon animals selling drugs, insurance premiums to be paid back, drinking during pregnancy, antibiotic-free meat and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

Why do we have to talk about hair loss in terms of “treatment”? Everyday life is not a medical condition.

Picture of William Heisel

Doug Wojcieszak talks about why doctors should apologize — not clam up — over their medical errors, and why some patients criticize his Sorry Works! program.

Picture of Ruxandra Guidi

The landfill in Salton City will go from being an 8-acre municipal site, to a 320-acre private one. But contamination from trash juice isn't the real concern: it's the threat of increased diesel truck traffic. There is a long-running scientific link between traffic air pollution and health problems.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Cartoon reforms, refunds from insurance companies, partisan wrangling, putting the poor in the path of pollution and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Holly Dolan

While walking down the street in the spring of late 1980’s Billy found a senior citizen crying on her porch.  When he approached her to find out why she was so upset, she explained, “my television is broken and it will cost $25 to fix.”  To many people this may not be a cause of such great sadness, but to a senior living alone on a fixed income, her only source of companionship was now gone.  

Picture of Kate Long

 

In the Mud River Volunteer Fire Department, 26 adults and children were sending balloons up in the air to celebrate the one-year anniversary of the Mud River Pound Punchers, one balloon for every pound they have lost.

 

Picture of Allie  Hostler

Journalists Allie Hostler and Jacob Simas examine how people on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation are dealing with rampant methamphetamine addiction.

Picture of Raquel Orellana

Does being part of an organization that "works to reduce hidden risks to the health, safety, and well-being of American consumers" sound like a job for you? Don’t miss our featured opportunity. 

Picture of Rachel  Dovey

With no licensing or certification, anyone can practice in-home elder care in California—and in wealthy Marin, opportunity for fraud abounds.

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