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Take away an artist’s paints. She may just use her fingers.

Take away a chef’s knives. He may opt to smash, grate or whip the ingredients instead.

But what if you are a doctor and the medical board takes away your ability to perform facelifts, liposuction, breast augmentation and tummy tucks?

If you are Dr. Carl Freeman Wurster in Boise, you beg.

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Most journalists don't pay much attention to their local "medically indigent" program, which offers health care to poor people who don't qualify for Medicaid or other government programs. But that's one of the local programs that could be at risk under health reform.

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Reforms unlikely to defeat obesity

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Gary Schwitzer is the professor that health reporters fear. With the creation of HealthNewsReview, he has brought back nightmares of having your work marked up in red and posted on a corkboard for everyone to see.

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Wayne A. Beach is a professor of communication at SDSU and an associate member of the Cancer Center in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. His research focuses on conversational and institutional interactions and their convergence, including medical interviewing and how families talk through cancer diagnosis and treatment. Beach has pioneered studies on how family members talk through illness dilemmas, including bulimia and terminal cancer, providing innovative approaches to understanding communication in casual and institutional health care contexts.

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John Golenski is executive director of the George Mark Children's House, a children's respite and end-of-life care facility in San Leandro, Calif., for children with life-limiting or terminal illnesses. All care is informed by the principles of palliative care. Additional support services are available to all family members, and services are provided regardless of a family's ability to pay. Golenski joined the George Mark Children's House after a long career in clinical services, health care ethics and health policy. From 1978 to 1979, he was executive director of the Shanti Project.

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James A. Crouch is executive director of the California Rural Indian Health Board. He is a member of the Cherokee Nation and overseas a multi-funded tribal organization providing direct health care services, technical assistance and advocacy to more than 45 tribes in California. Crouch received a bachelor's degree from the School of International Services at American University in Washington, D.C., and earned a master's in public health at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Carolyn Walker is a professor of nursing in SDSU's School of Nursing and assistant dean for student services in graduate and research affairs at SDSU. Walker's clinical and research specialty is pediatric nursing with a subspecialty in pediatric oncology. She chaired the research committee for the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses for five years and has also served as its president. Walker received her associate's degree in nursing from Fullerton College in 1968, her B.S. in nursing from California State University, Fullerton in 1976, her M.S.

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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