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Ventura

Picture of Julio Vaqueiro Borbolla

Elvia works as a medical interpreter in the Ventura County. Today, she is accompanying the occupational therapist Rachel Pile, who speaks only English. Every Monday, they work on 2-year-old Miguel’s therapy. His mother, Eulalia, only speaks and understands Mixteco.

Picture of Julio Vaqueiro Borbolla

An estimated 165,000 indigenous Mexican immigrants live and work in the fields of California. Some 80% of them do not speak English or Spanish. This cultural and language barrier makes it difficult to treat mental illnesses in the community.

Picture of Julio Vaqueiro Borbolla

In the fields in the Ventura County some of the workers speak Mixteco. Many of these indigenous farm workers, like Florino, are living in the country illegally. They typically don’t have access to health care. Most of them face poor living conditions and backbreaking daily labor in the fields.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Many homeless people have severe mental disorders yet remain on the streets for months or even years. The challenge for social service providers and authorities is that these vulnerable and sometimes volatile people often refuse help.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Among Ventura County’s chronically homeless, 37 percent reported a mental illness in the 2015 count. Some officials believe the real percentage is likely higher because the annual survey relies on homeless people self-reporting mental illness, and some may not realize it or don’t want to admit it.

Picture of Roseann Langlois

Californians are required to disclose the radon level in their home, if known, before transferring it to a new owner. Nevadans are not. In both states, renters are particularly vulnerable. "There are no regulations to protect renters from radon in Nevada," said Susan Howe, radon education program director for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. "There are no regulations dealing with radon in Nevada, period. There are no laws to protect people when they buy or build homes."

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