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Viagra

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The makers of popular drugs like Advair, Cymbalta, Viagra and Zoloft have physicians, psychiatrists, and medical school faculty members across California on their payrolls. Does this influence prescribing patterns?

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Viagra okay in Catholic health plans, health policy valentines, and hospital "loss leaders," plus more in today's Daily Briefing.

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Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

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After being busted for dispensing prescriptions over the Internet and providing poor medical care to his patients, Dr. Stephen Hollis says he still maintains a thriving eye surgery practice. He talks about his past and present in a surprisingly candid interview.

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A doctor busted for prescribing drugs for an Internet pharmacy talks about how and why he did it.

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Radiation from Japan's emerging nuclear crisis isn't likely to reach the West Coast, experts say. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Health journalists and patient advocates should be on high alert for the changes that are sure to come with the announcement last week that the FDA has approved the Lap-Band device for nearly every person with a few pounds to lose.

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PRAYER: Is a new study on the apparent power of hands-on prayer to improve hearing and sight of disabled Africans really getting this much media attention? Say it ain’t so! So far, the Los Angeles Times Booster Shots blogs offers the best context and caveats.

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A new drug comes on the market that promises to improve people’s eyesight. “Clarivue! Make your cloudy days sunny again!”

Your editor says, “This Clarivue is like Viagra for eyeballs. It’s going to be flying off the shelves. Write up something for the Web in the next hour.”

Your next move should be to find out the NNT: the number needed to treat. It will help you answer the most important question: How many people would need to take Clarivue in order for one person to actually see better?

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