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Vioxx

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“Research” establishing the flame retardant chemical deca (Deca-BDE ) as safe can be traced to just 12 blood samples obtained in 1988 and “spun” by a consulting company hired by chemical makers. The toxicologist who analyzed and disseminated the research, Dennis Paustenbach, is known for his resear

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Have you ever noticed how warnings about dangerous prescription drug always seem to surface after the drug is no longer marketed and its patent has run out?

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Many say the only justice that will get Big Pharma's attention is frog marching the CEOs off to prison and/or cutting them off from their lucrative public trough of Medicare, Medicaid and military health programs.

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 Marketed to men, testosterone is supposed to be a way to stay young and virile. Marketed to women, it is supposed to be a way to recapture waning sexual desire and boost the libido.

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Researching, writing and submitting papers to medical journals--and reworking and finessing them if accepted--is a demanding, time consuming job which drug companies have made into pay dirt.

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The profit party is over for Big Pharma except for one category--drugs for autoimmune diseases. Conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and plaque psoriasis are rare in the adult population but a spate of new ads and self-diagnosing "quizzes" suggest they ar

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Today's news roundup features the good and the bad in the fight against AIDS, health questions about food in cans, and a book for your long weekend. The Daily Briefing will go offline until Monday, so we sign off with some (health-related) Thanksgiving reads.

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A new company aims to clean up the FDA's messy data for reporting drug adverse events and market it to pharma and other businesses. Health reporters can benefit from the company's work, too.

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After 60+ years of smoking, my mother-in-law’s lungs were surely a toxic wasteland, yet nothing would make her quit. Journalist Ricki Lewis examines the risks and benefits of Chantix and highlights a new way to get smokers to quit: texting.

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Dr. Carl Elliott, a University of Minnesota bioethicist, has spent much of the last two years doggedly pursuing the case of Dan Markingson, a 26-year-old who killed himself during a UM clinical trial meant to prove the superiority of AstraZeneca’s Seroquel over its competitors.

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This month marks the sober anniversary of the police killing of George Floyd, which ignited global protests and renewed efforts to reform or dismantle policing. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the price society pays for a criminal-legal system that disproportionately arrests, punishes and kills Black people. And we’ll look at how reporters can best cover this evolving story in original and powerful ways. Sign-up here!

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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