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Washington D.C.

Picture of Jonetta Barras
This series was produced as part of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism  Fellowship with a grant from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being.
Picture of Barrington Salmon
In Washington, D.C., the rush to capitalize on the influx of more affluent residents is having long-term effects on the health of residents young and old.
Picture of Anna Romano

Politico Pro needs a new health care reporter with experience covering national health care policy and politics at the professional level.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Depression, bipolar disorder, seasonal allergies, insomnia and gastro reflux disease (GERD) are just some of the "diseases" that tripled and quadrupled in the population thanks to direct-to-consumer drug advertising that began in the 1990s.

Picture of Kathleen Sharp

Every once in a while, a story not only finds a reporter, it hounds her. That was the case with my new book about two friends who blew the whistle on one of the deadliest prescription drugs in U.S. history.

Picture of William Heisel

For the past year and a half, Julie Sullivan at the Oregonian, one of the country’s most consistent and skilled investigative reporters, has been writing about troops that were exposed to the cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium in Iraq.

Picture of Suzanne Bohan

While reporting for a four-part series on the wide gap in life expectancies and disease rates between people in nearby neighborhoods – due to drastically different conditions and social status – I expected to find that health care reform legislation would do little to address this issue. The reform legislation, after all, is primarily about health care insurance. But I was surprised to find that, for the first time, Congressional legislation contains at least $3.4 billion to focus on improving health disparities.

Picture of William Heisel

This is the second part of my conversation with Dr. John Dombrowski, a Washington D.C. anesthesiologist and pain management specialist who sits on the American Society of Anesthesiology's administrative affairs committee.

Picture of William Heisel

Four days after Michael Jackson died of an unexpected heart attack on June 25, Dr. John Dombrowski,an anesthesiologist and pain management specialist, posted a letter on his Web site, demanding better pain management for all patients and a recognition that pain care is an important specialty.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

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