Skip to main content.

Washington

Picture of William Heisel

Missed Coachella Live? Health journalists have their own version this week at the Association of Health Care Journalists Conference in Atlanta. Here's a preview.

Picture of Edwin Bender

Tips for following the money trail of vaccine exemption legislation in your state.

Picture of William Heisel

Why do people in Montana know more about their cows than their healthcare-acquired infections like MRSA? And what does that mean for patient safety?

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Regenerative Sciences, a medical company that pioneered a procedure to treat orthopedic injuries using patients’ own stem cells, is fighting the Food and Drug Administration tooth and nail over a claim that human cells should be federally regulated as drugs, in a landmark case that has far-reaching implications for the future of regenerative medicine.

Picture of Vicky Hallett

Too many folks have the wrong idea about the YWCA — and not just because they figure it’s the same thing as the YMCA.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

The American Red Cross, the largest supplier of donated blood in the U.S., was fined $9.6 million after federal inspectors found hundreds of blood safety violations at 16 of the organization’s 36 blood collection centers nationwide.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Three out of four Americans want government to do something to curb overuse of antibiotics on animal farms that supply most of the nation’s meat, and many believe the resulting rise of antibiotic-resistant superbugs is a serious threat to human health, Gergana Koleva reports.

Pages

Announcements

The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth