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waste management

Picture of Ruxandra Guidi

Puente Hills is the country’s largest landfill, taking in about 12,000 tons of trash daily. But if Americans are buying less stuff and recycling more, do we still need mega-landfills?

Picture of Ruxandra Guidi

The landfill in Salton City will go from being an 8-acre municipal site, to a 320-acre private one. But contamination from trash juice isn't the real concern: it's the threat of increased diesel truck traffic. There is a long-running scientific link between traffic air pollution and health problems.

Picture of Collin Tong

We may have plenty of clean water for our own needs, but if anything that has only spurred more interest in helping the rest of the world.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Nearly every day, Arleen Hernandez battles an aging septic tank that backs up into her toilet and shower. Upon moving to Parklawn in 1986, she didn’t realize her new neighborhood lacks basic public services.

Picture of Rebekah Cowell

In Orange and Guilford counties, neighbors fight landfill expansions

Picture of Martha Shirk

America has trash pickers, too. A visit to a recycling facility in San Jose, California, suggests numerous health and workplace safety stories for journalists to explore in their communities.

Picture of Noelle  Robbins

In an effort to promote awareness of the relationship between healthy forests, healthy people and healthy economies, The UN has declared 2011 the International Year of Forests. One overlooked reality links healthy forests, healthy people and improved global sanitation: the production and use of toilet paper, from forest to flush.

 

Picture of John  Sepulvado

California regulators stop monitoring PCBs in the air at the Kettleman Hills Facility, then birth defects increase in Kettleman City, then regulators start monitoring, and birth defects go down.

Picture of Rebekah Cowell

How an enormous wastewater treatment plant wound up near a small town's historic district.

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