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Picture of Giles Bruce
Here’s how reporters can investigate contamination in their communities.
Picture of Yereth Rosen
It includes $230 million for an EPA water grant program in Alaska, as well as money for climate resilience — some of which is designated for community relocation.
Picture of Yereth Rosen
The bipartisan infrastructure bill that passed the U.S. Senate includes $3.5 billion for water and sanitation, some of which will go to rural Alaska villages.
Picture of Meredith Cooper
In December, when people started to be allowed to return to their homes — if they were standing — benzene was discovered in the water supply.
Picture of Greta Mart
Neighbors of the oil field are concerned about the safety of their drinking water wells, should new drilling and waste disposal edge closer to their properties in the coming years.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

The tragedy in Flint continues to fill headlines. But nearly every community is at risk from some form of lead contamination. In our webinar this week, veteran reporters and experts offered journalists fresh ideas for covering such stories.

Picture of Ezra David  Romero

Drought conditions in parts of Central California have become so harsh that it’s normal to turn on the tap have no coming out. Now, some of the town’s residents will have access to something they haven’t had in months — hot showers.

Picture of Terria  Smith

Mary Belardo drives down the half-mile dirt road to her home. Her house – built by All Mission Indian Housing Authority – sits on a nearly 40 acre allotment on the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indian Reservation in Thermal, Calif.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

What got me interested in San Lucas was contaminated drinking water there, but my reporting revealed deeper issues like the ability of local government to function, how to do business in a town without water, and tense dynamics between government and the private sector.

Picture of Liza Gross

Where you live—and who you are—plays a big part in how long you’ll live. If you live in poverty in California’s San Joaquin Valley, and you're Latino, you’re twice as likely to die prematurely as someone who is white and lives in an upper-class community.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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