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Picture of Sarah Hughes
"I asked one sociologist who studies poverty in Philadelphia if she knows what happened to the families who lost their benefits over the past decade. She told me the question keeps her up at night."
Picture of Giles Bruce
Why does Indiana have so many cases of child abuse and neglect? Only six states had more in 2016, and they all had much higher populations.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Locals are the first to acknowledge that pouring more money into the city isn’t the only answer.
Picture of Perla Trevizo
Perla Trevizo is a recipient of the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being.
Picture of Perla Trevizo
Perla Trevizo is a recipient of the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. Other stories in this series can be found here.
Picture of Ryan White

In the wake of studies finding big differences in language ability between rich and poor kids by the age of 18 months, a leading researcher outlines the latest thinking on how to bridge the class-based "word gap."

Picture of Ryan White

In the U.S., social welfare benefits tend to impose tight restrictions on recipients. But in Manitoba, low-income pregnant women can receive a no-strings-attached cash boost. Research suggests it leads to healthier babies.

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

North Carolina signed up more enrollees in Obamacare than any other red state. Yet politically, the legislation remains a huge liability for Democrats in the state. That's partly a result of enrollment organizers' attempt to keep insurance sign-ups as separate from the issue's politics as possible.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

In Michigan, companies have begun to recover, businesses are hiring and the economy is humming again. But recovery has remained elusive for many families whose struggles have been exacerbated by severe cuts to social safety nets, education and social programs.

Picture of Rachel Dornhelm

The Women, Infants and Children Program provides food vouchers and nutritional education to low income families. California runs the biggest WIC program in the nation -- 60 percent of all infants born in this state are enrolled in it. Now, the program's changing the kinds of food it recommends. Reporter: Rachel Dornhelm

aired on http://www.californiareport.org/

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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