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Picture of Theodore Alcorn
When it comes to drinking, how much is too much?
Picture of Viji Sundaram
California’s coercive control law was enacted too late to help Blanca in her divorce from a husband she describes as manipulative and emotionally abusive.
Picture of Chloe Lee Rowlands
"I worked with a lot of seniors facing a tremendous amount of stress and housing insecurity and, you know, deciding between feeding your pets, yourself, or paying your rent," said one Bay Area director of senior housing.
Picture of Viji Sundaram
A judge in Southern California embraced a new state law allowing victims to claim coercive control, that was designed to tip the balance in favor of women seeking child custody and restraining orders.
Picture of Viji Sundaram
A California law broadening domestic violence protections could help restrain abusers who manipulate their partners financially and psychologically. Two women who sought remedies through the courts share stories of a justice system stacked against them.
Picture of Viji Sundaram
One immigrant endured more than two decades of psychological and financial abuse by her husband yet didn’t think she was a victim. Legal safeguards are limited and came too late to help her.
Picture of Nikie Johnson
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Nikie Johnson, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship....
Picture of Gary Walker
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Gary Walker, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship....
Picture of Otim  Richard

For many young women in rural Eastern Uganda, access to clean water is just one of many obstacles barring educational achievement and an escape from generational poverty

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

A Texas GOP plan to exclude 40 Planned Parenthood clinics from the state's Texas Woman’s Health Program has lead to fewer claims for birth control and wellness exams as well as lower overall enrollment numbers.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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