Skip to main content.

Youth

Picture of Rachel  Dissell
As part of The Plain Dealer's "Dear Cleveland" series, the newspaper is bringing young voices to the forefront of the community conversation.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
Spurred by the death of 17-year-old Elord Revolte after a fight in a Miami-Dade County juvenile lockup, the Miami Herald undertook an exhaustive investigation into the state’s deeply troubled juvenile justice system.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
A data-driven look at opioid addiction in San Diego found that old assumptions about addiction hotspots were outdated. Reporter Leo Castaneda shares this and other field lessons he learned along the way.
Picture of Ryan Burns

This story was produced as a project for the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Picture of Joseph  Geha

Silicon Valley is home to some of the world’s richest, most advanced companies. But underneath highways and along riverbeds, a scattered network of shantytowns endures. Santa Clara Co. has one of the most acute homelessness problems in the nation.

Picture of Cindy Uken

Montana native D Gregory Smith felt alone, helpless and suicidal as a teen about feelings for other young men. He became a priest hoping to turn off his sexuality, but ultimately decided to come out as a gay man. He now counsels LGBT high school and college students and gay men.

Picture of Cindy Uken

Dominic Liam Gliko, 20, discusses the challenges he faced as an adolescent wrestling with his sexuality, including attempts at suicide. Born female, Gliko ultimately decided to become a man.

Picture of Cindy Uken

Being LGBT is not a risk factor for suicide, but the stressors they encounter, like discrimination and harassment, are directly associated with suicidal behavior. The challenge of being an LGBT youth is compounded in mostly rural Montana, where there are few places for "different" people to belong.

Picture of Stephanie Woodard

Indian country is a very different world from the one most of us mainstream reporters inhabit. Here are some ways to make stories about Native Americans easier to put together and more accurate.

Picture of Stephanie Woodard

Native teens and twenty-somethings are killing themselves at an alarming pace. For those 15 to 24, the rate is 3.5 times that of other Americans and rising.

Pages

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth