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Fellowship Story Showcase

Explore our 2213 stories.

As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

A Crisis in Caring: California's School Nursing Shortage focuses on the critical shortage of school nurses in Northern California, and its impact on students, teachers, parents and whole communities. California's top leaders, local physicians and students with chronic illnesses weigh in on the crisis.

When her doctor told her she was a borderline diabetic, Rose Morales took the warning seriously. The 50-year-old Ventura woman had seen what diabetes had done to her relatives.

No Racial Boundary for HIV

HIV/AIDS is an emerging public health problem in the Asian community in the United States. Rong Xiaoqing, a recipient of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, examines its impact for the Chinese-language publication Sing Tao Daily.

Part 2: Cultural tradition traps Chinese elder-abuse victims in U.S.

The Women, Infants and Children Program provides food vouchers and nutritional education to low income families. California runs the biggest WIC program in the nation -- 60 percent of all infants born in this state are enrolled in it. Now, the program's changing the kinds of food it recommends. Reporter: Rachel Dornhelm

aired on http://www.californiareport.org/

The "Shortened Lives: Where You Live Matters" project, produced by staff writers Suzanne Bohan and Sandy Kleffman, ran in 2009 as a four-part series in the Contra Costa Times and the Oakland Tribune, now-defunct daily newspapers in Northern California .

Over five days, Colorado Public News examines how Grand Junction, Colo. has emerged as a model of low-cost, high-quality, near-universal healthcare. Part 1 details how health care professionals and leaders have built a system with an emphasis on primary care and prevention.

Serious depression is a growing problem for multicultural seniors. But unlike older whites, ethnic people 50-plus are blocked from treatment by poverty, limited or no insurance, lack of programs geared for them—and the stigma of mental problems that permeates many cultures. New America media senior editor Paul Kleyman begins his occasional series on mental challenges for ethnic seniors with this article on treatable depression.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

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