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ACA

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Amid talk of ACA repeal, the signs suggest that the new Congress and president will diminish the emphasis on value-based health care. Here's what reporters should keep in mind.
Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno
Rufino Jiménez is a legal U.S. resident who pays $17 a month for health insurance he receives through his employer. But he does not have time to go see a doctor — he doesn't even have time to stop and eat his lunch. His struggles are far from unique.
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President-elect Donald Trump’s central health message has consisted of promising to repeal the ACA. But that remains difficult with Democrats still commanding enough power in the Senate to block the 60 votes needed for full repeal.
Picture of Hannah Esqueda
While California's Medicaid expansion has helped provide first-time health insurance to residents throughout the Central San Joaquin Valley, patients living in rural communities still face tremendous obstacles to actually receiving care.
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The Federal Trade Commission and California Attorney General have spent more than three years examining the merger proposal to weigh antitrust concerns.
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In California, fines up to $125,000 per preventable mistake have not made a significant dent in the number of medical errors. Despite recent gains, the number is still higher than when the state’s program began nine years ago.

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The court's tie decision last week on Obama's immigration orders will have a profound impact on the Latino community, which has always had the highest numbers of uninsured, writes opinion columnist Henrik Rehbinder.

Picture of Jacqueline García

Senate Bill 10, recently signed by Gov. Jerry Brown, could open the door to coverage for DACA recipients and undocumented residents currently excluded from ACA exchange coverage.

Picture of Jacqueline García

Stephanie Martinez has health insurance, but like many in her situation, her road to coverage was complicated by her family’s mixed-immigration status and household income.

Picture of Jacqueline García

For many of the young immigrants who applied for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status, getting health insurance has not been easy. For others, it hasn’t been a priority.

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