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ACA

Picture of Alicia Chang

The Affordable Care Act promises to expand health coverage to millions of Americans who would otherwise go without. Excluded are people living in the U.S. illegally who are barred from signing up and who won't be penalized for not carrying insurance.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

When the ACA is fully implemented in 2019, as many as four million people in California may remain uninsured, and these Californians are more likely to be undocumented, Latino, poor, or some combination of the above.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

The data on the much-lauded Patient Centered Medical Home approach, a cornerstone of ACA, shows that it is expensive, onerously bureaucratic, a drain on health care resources, especially for primary care providers, and a distraction from health care delivery.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Underwhelming results demonstrate that after all the money and effort invested in bureaucracy, Patient Centered Medical Homes do not contribute to actual patient care.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Patient-Centered Primary Care Medical Homes have been around for decades. The more you know about the intention behind them, the more you wonder, "How could that not be a good idea?" Based on the research, cost of implementation and effect on patient care, the answer I found may surprise you.

Picture of Laurie Tarkan

Here's a post I edited for my blog, WellBeeFile, addressing a question I hadn't seen this asked in the media: how will the Affordable Care Act affect divorced women, who often struggle financially? I ran the question by Washington State social and health researcher Bridget Lavelle.

Picture of Liza Gross

As the Affordable Care Act rolls out in 2014, tens of millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to health coverage. But at least 3 million Californians will remain uninsured, including low-income adults and 1 million undocumented residents.

Picture of Elaine Korry

Sensory impaired children or those with conditions such as asthma or diabetes benefit from “habilitative services" that teach them skills and abilities needed manage their conditions. As the Affordable Care Act gets implemented the question remains: who will pay for these services?

Picture of Heather Boerner

It's difficult for Norma Navarro to explain to her children why they get different treatment -- one was born in the U.S. and the other is undocumented. With implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the gap between their treatment may continue to grow.

Picture of Erin Marcus

Florida's controversial Medicaid privatization program has made the system more difficult to navigate over the past decade, according to some patients and health advocates. Has the U.S. Supreme Court's ACA ruling given the state an opening to expand privatization further?

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