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access to care

Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
It can be hard to find new, compelling ways of telling stories about well-known health issues. But as reporter Elizabeth Aguilera discovered in her series on type 2 diabetes, that shouldn’t stop you.
Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno
A sizable percentage of California farmworkers are still struggling to get access to health services for themselves and their families.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
The technology isn’t a panacea for all that ails rural health care today. Some areas still lack the required internet connectivity, and critics say telemedicine doesn't enrich a local economy in the way a hospital does, providing jobs and other community goods.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

People with insurance are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with a chronic condition than uninsured people. That means that as the number of insured grows, the health system will have to cope with an influx of patients newly diagnosed with conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

Picture of Judy  Silber

A new survey based on text messages finds that most Californians with health insurance are satisfied with their coverage and ability to get appointments. But the survey also found the coverage sign-up process poses big hurdles for the majority of uninsured respondents.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

I was just beginning to wrap my head around the Affordable Care Act when President Obama and legislators started proposing plans for comprehensive immigration reform this week. That led me to wonder: What could immigration reform mean for health reform?

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

On January 1, California will begin transitioning children from the Healthy Families Program, a low-cost health insurance program for kids and teens, into Medi-Cal, the state’s version of Medicaid.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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