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Armed Attack

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The gun lobby loves the short memory of the American public and the news media. Who remembers that Aaron Alexis killed 12 at Washington's Navy Yard just three months ago, legally buying a shotgun two days before the rampage.

Picture of Collin Tong

Village Health Works has rebuilt a war-torn Burundian village, teaching community members who used to kill each other to instead care for one another. Seattle's global health community is on board.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Imagine lawmakers allowing lead to remain in gasoline because of the oil and gas lobby. Imagine them allowing secondhand smoke in public places because of the tobacco lobby. Pretty ridiculous except that's exactly why we have the parade of bloody AR-15 massacres--the gun lobby.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

It is hard to find a more impassioned group than conceal carriers who contend that they keep themselves and others safe by being armed. Yet is it true? Reports by ABC's 20/20 and the Violence Policy Institute indicate no.

Picture of Sue Luttner

An exasperating series of convictions and exonerations has reminded me both how big a price child-care providers are paying in the child-abuse arena and how hard it is to pin down the facts about shaken baby syndrome....

Picture of Michelle Levander

Most journalists aren't venturing into Latino communities to get the story of Herbalife's aggressive sales techniques. They're missing a great tale, but a Latino high school student didn't.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The label on the malaria drug, developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in the 1970s after another malaria drug used in Vietnam failed, warns of psychosis, hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, aggression, tremors, confusion, abnormal dreams and suicide. The drug still prescribed to US

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here's a recap of the latest developments on the health reform front, along with some helpful resources and story ideas for your community.

March 21, 2010, 10 p.m. PST

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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