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born on drugs

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What happens to the growing number of drug-exposed babies? Answers "proved maddeningly difficult to tease out — much harder than we expected," writes reporter Teri Sforza.
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Parents can feel hopeless when they enter the child welfare system. And things get complicated when California steps in to play parent.
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Becoming a new mom is stressful for the best-prepared women; struggling with addiction on top of that can lead to danger for them both.
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Over the decade from 2008 to 2017, as the opioid epidemic took hold, the number of drug-exposed infants born per year nearly tripled in California
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When the "crack baby epidemic" of the 1980s and '90s was raging, many experts offered stark, long-term forecasts. While those were overblown, there still is cause for concern. This series was produced with the support of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund.

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