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Covered California

Picture of Hannah Esqueda
In the largely rural Central San Joaquin Valley, a reporter tracking efforts to expand access to health care in the wake of Obamacare finds that "many of the most effective outreach tools at play involve very little technology."
Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno
A sizable percentage of California farmworkers are still struggling to get access to health services for themselves and their families.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

“We expected to find a larger difference between plans on and off the exchange,” said researcher Simon Haeder. “In both cases, it was very unlikely to get an appointment.”

Picture of Jacqueline García

Senate Bill 10, recently signed by Gov. Jerry Brown, could open the door to coverage for DACA recipients and undocumented residents currently excluded from ACA exchange coverage.

Picture of Jacqueline García

Stephanie Martinez has health insurance, but like many in her situation, her road to coverage was complicated by her family’s mixed-immigration status and household income.

Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno

The number of uninsured Latino Californians has dropped dramatically in the last three years. But Latinos still make up more than half of the remaining uninsured.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Our Remaking Health Care blog talks with Shannon McConville of the Public Policy Institute of California about how the health care safety net has fared under Obamacare, as well as other developments reporters should keep tabs on.

Picture of Peiwen Jing

As a reporter who was born and raised in China, I had a hard time trying to figure out what my health insurance options were when I came to Los Angeles for graduate school. What was Obamacare? What was Covered California? The challenges go beyond language barriers.

Picture of Ryan White

Two journalists, a doctor and a nonprofit leader offer tips and context for how to tell urgent stories from underserved communities in the midst of the ongoing Obamacare rollout.

Picture of Jacqueline García

Of the more than 836,000 young immigrants who've applied for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, a significant number have been able to continue their higher education, apply for college and receive financial aid. But health coverage has been trickier.

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