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Covered California

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

In California, Certified Enrollment Counselors fill a role under the Affordable Care Act similar to the one that’s often described as a “navigator” on a national level. But under Covered California, CECs and navigators are not the same thing.

Picture of Ryan White

The looming March 31 deadline gives ongoing urgency to the efforts of Covered California to refine and improve strategies for reaching groups, such as Latinos and African Americans, whose enrollment numbers have so far lagged.

Picture of Maria Ortiz-Briones

In a region hobbled by the country's worst air pollution, high obesity rates, and lack of culturally sensitive doctors, Vida en el Valle will take a look at what immediate impacts the Affordable Care Act will have in the San Joaquin Valley.

Picture of Na Li

While the mission of Covered California is to provide affordable health insurance to Californians, there may be some unexpected problems coming along with it.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

When the ACA is fully implemented in 2019, as many as four million people in California may remain uninsured, and these Californians are more likely to be undocumented, Latino, poor, or some combination of the above.

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

Insurance agents believe they were an afterthought for Covered California, which from the get-go, placed the emphasis on training county health care workers and counselors at nonprofits to help people find the right coverage for them.

Picture of Momo Chang

The fellowship project is looking at outreach to, and enrollment of, limited English speakers in Covered California, our state's version of the Affordable Care Act.

Picture of Ryan White

S.F. health officials say their focus is now on retaining and attracting new Medi-Cal patients. The challenge gives fresh urgency to efforts to improve customer service, lower appointment wait times and boost efficiency.

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

When Covered California reports its health insurance enrollment figures each month, one worrying statistic consistently jumps out –- the low number of Latinos signing up. This became the top news story out of the exchange in January, overshadowing the overall positive numbers.

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

In California, the effort to get people signed up for insurance has proceeded with little partisan rancor, and at a quickening pace. December enrollment was nearly four times that of October and November combined. Nonetheless, millions of Californians remain uninsured.

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