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criminal justice system

Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
As schools have returned to in-person instruction, advocates for children say they’re starting to see an uptick in juvenile justice complaints. We look at how diversion works in other countries.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
Juvenile justice advocates see a disproportionate number of children with reading disabilities. The pandemic shed a light on those inequities.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
School-based juvenile justice complaints decreased when children were not in school during the pandemic, but what about now?
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
When schools shut down at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, juvenile delinquency complaints decreased. Here’s what it means — and what it doesn’t.
Picture of Cary Aspinwall
As women go to jail at staggering rates, Dallas Morning News reporter Cary Aspinwall tapped into her outrage to tell the story of how their children get overlooked.

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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