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cyanobacteria

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In California, cyanotoxins have become more of a problem amid the drought. The same toxin that shut down Toledo, Ohio’s water supply in 2014 has been detected in lakes, reservoirs and streams across the state.

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“To find out after the fact that this could have been avoided — you put my kid through a little nightmare here and you affected his health,” said one mother whose 13-year-old son fell ill after jet skiing in the lake.

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Cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, produces potent toxins that sicken people and animals. This is the second time the state has issued a warning about the bacteria and its toxins at Pyramid Lake.

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There are no confirmed human deaths linked to toxins produced by cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, in the U.S., but in the wake of reports of dogs dying from ingesting these toxins, people are worried about the potential harm to humans.

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It took less than 30 minutes for the 2-year-old golden retriever to die. One moment, the dog was swimming alongside her owners' canoe. The next, she was seizing and foaming at the mouth. Experts say toxic algae is a rising threat in California waters.

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