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drug epidemic

Picture of William Heisel
Recent stories from the New York Times and the Washington Post encapsulate why language choices are so important for responsible reporting on addiction.
Picture of William Heisel
Now that President Trump has officially declared the opioid crisis a national emergency, data can inform how to properly tackle the problem, community by community.
Picture of Ed Williams
When Erin Borrego was 15, she and her classmates started experimenting with opioid painkillers. It started with pills called Percocet and Lortab, but she quickly moved on to injecting heroin.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
Opioid addiction has claimed thousands of lives in San Diego County. Understanding who is dying and how addiction has changed over the last 15 years is central to confronting the addiction epidemic.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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