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EPA

Picture of Katharine Gammon
Earlier this year, the EPA rejected a long-running petition to ban chlorpyrifos, which poses serious health risks to young children. But the health threats go way beyond chlorpyrifos, a leading researcher says.
Picture of Jamie Hopkins
Why nearness is a problem, what schools can do and how parents have led the way.
Picture of Jamie Hopkins
Across the country, in big cities and small towns, kids attend schools so close to busy roads that traffic exhaust poses a health risk.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
While the government banned lead-based paint in 1978, more than 75 percent of houses in Chicago were built before 1970, affecting children with lead poisoning.
Picture of Jamie Hopkins
"There exists a class of hyper-polluters — the worst-of-the-worst — that disproportionately expose communities of color and low income populations to chemical releases," researchers write in a 2016 paper.
Picture of Liza Gross

Oxnard and surrounding Ventura County grow more than 630 million pounds of strawberries a year. The pesticides that growers depend on—a revolving roster of caustic and highly volatile chemicals called fumigants—are among the most toxic used in agriculture.

Picture of William Heisel

Leah Beth Ward's sustained reporting in The Yakima Herald-Republic on the impacts of Washington’s dairy industry has helped spur important changes. In the second half of our Q&A, Ward discusses the reaction to her series, both from the industry and the broader community.

Picture of Natasha Dado

Natasha Dado wrote this series for The Arab American News as a fellow in the 2014 National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. This story was also published by New American Media. Read earlier parts of this series here:...

Picture of David Danelski

The federal Clean Air Act of 1970 prompted changes that led to dramatic air quality improvements, but some Inland communities still don’t meet standards.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Prolonged hot streaks can wither crops, buckle roads, cause train derailments when metal tracks warp in the heat, and trigger power outages because of the high demand for electricity. But the most profound effect of unflaggingly high temperatures is on our health.

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