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Exide

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An investigation into a Sacramento gun range ultimately spurred new legislation to better protect workers from lead poisoning.
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An investigation finds that at least 80 companies continue to have workers in California who are lead-poisoned at levels high enough to cause birth defects, tremors and a variety of brain disorders.
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California Assembly Bill 2963, which is to be heard this week by the Senate Health Committee, aims to ensure there are no more cases like Exide or Mangan Park.
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Battery recycling is considered one of the most potentially hazardous industries. Yet Vernon’s Exide workers were routinely being poisoned with nearly nonexistent intervention by Cal/OSHA.
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Joe Rubin investigated the Exide plant as a data reporting fellow at the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. 
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Residents living near the now-shuttered Exide battery recycling center in east Los Angeles fought hard to close the lead-emitting plant. But their struggles continue, as they now turn to a cleanup effort of daunting proportions.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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