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Indian Country

Picture of Debra Krol
“I have bad news for you,” my editor said during a phone call in late August 2017. “We’re closing in two weeks.”
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Two reporters share their tips and insights from reporting on health issues in Indian Country.
Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins
In reviewing the series that I wrote for the USC Annenberg School of Journalism School of Health Journalism, it is critical to remember that it was penned during a very different political climate than the one we are currently facing in the United States. When the piece began, the Obama administrati
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

For a reporting project on food insecurity in Native American communities, finding the data was the easy, writes Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton. But finding families willing to talk candidly about the problem was much harder.

Picture of SE Ruckman

Despite living in a state where Medicaid was not expanded, Oklahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes have found a way to state tribal liaison Sally Carter. And she has found her way to them.

Picture of SE Ruckman

Imagine living in communities that defy social definition. This is Indian country, where our identification is usually stereotyped as sports mascots, grandparents raise their grandchildren and the annual household income isn't even in the same neighborhood as the national average.  ...

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