Skip to main content.

Laura's Law

Picture of Megan Burke

Michelle Kwik's son, Evan, showed signs of mental illness when he was 12 years old. This past February, he shot and killed himself after a 10-hour standoff with San Diego Sheriff's Deputies. Kwik agreed to share her personal experience trying to get help for her son.

Picture of Megan Burke

A California law designed to help people who have serious mental illness and refuse treatment has only been fully implemented in rural Nevada County, north of Sacramento. San Diego County is considering implementation of what's also know as Assisted Outpatient Treatment as an option.

Picture of Megan Burke

More than 41,000 adults get mental health services from San Diego County. Still, as many as 10,000 in need of help may be falling through the cracks.

Picture of Ryan White

A California law allows courts to order assisted outpatient treatment for people with a history of serious mental illness and violence. This raises a dilemma: Should society be able to force mentally ill individuals to get treatment, or does that amount to a infringement on their civil liberties?

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth