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lead paint

Picture of Barbara Laker
A year after a first grader was severely poisoned from peeling lead paint in his classroom, City Council on Thursday unanimously passed historic legislation aimed at ensuring such an injury never happens again.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
A family with a young child in Los Angeles found dangerous levels of lead in their rental. But they haven't been able to find another home in the region's extremely tight housing market.
Picture of Susan  Abram
They analyzed chipped paint in old homes, hunted down landlords, begged families to speak with them, and even got down on their hands and knees to collect contaminated soil.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
Toxic City is supported by grants from the Lenfest Institute for Journalism, the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism and the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism....

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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