Skip to main content.

maternal depression

Picture of Elissa Lee
A new study out this week shows the economic costs of untreated mood and anxiety disorders among moms exceeds $14 billion dollars through the first five years of a child's life.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
 Are there better ways to help women suffering from domestic violence and maternal depression? Forward-thinking providers and programs located at LAC+USC Medical Center are trying new approaches.
Picture of Adam Wolfberg
The CDC estimates that about one in 10 women experience symptoms of depression after their baby is born. That’s starting to look like a huge underestimate.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
Depression in fathers can hinder the development of healthy bonds between parent and child and lead to neglect. One L.A. pilot program is trying to prevent that.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
In 2015, fewer than 10 percent of new mothers were screened for depression at Cedars-Sinai in L.A. Psychologist Eynav Accortt set out to change that.
Picture of Tonya Pavlenko
Even with help from food stamps and a federal nutrition program, nearly half of U.S. households receiving such benefits struggle to feed their families.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
When Jessica Porten sought help for postpartum depression, she wasn't expecting the nurse to call the police to escort her to the ER. She now believes moms need far better help for their mental health needs.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
Only recently have researchers fully understood how critical “language nutrition” is for children’s cognitive growth. As a result, new programs aim to help parents increase their kids’ language skills.

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth