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medication

Picture of Emily Bader
Like many patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain, Todd Papianou, a high school teacher from Rumford, knows the thin line between life-saving and life-destroying medication.
Picture of Larry Buhl
Only a small percentage of Americans who could benefit from the PrEP pill are using it, despite its effectiveness.
Picture of Adia White
This reporting is supported by the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund.   
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

If the government changes the rules of the game to satisfy sellers of Medicare Advantage plans that count on high star ratings for bonus payments, then what good are the ratings? The ratings are "a farce," one critic says.

Picture of Monya De

New online communities are offering patients support and guidance to an extent not previously possible. That can be a huge boon for colon cancer patients, who might otherwise find themselves isolated and afraid.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

When extremely expensive new hepatitis C medications arrived on the market more than two years ago, private health insurers limited access to the very sickest. Now, two new analyses say that approach is shortsighted and counterproductive.

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

Despite recent cost-cutting measures, California’s spending on pharmaceuticals has gone up, and so has the number of pricey drugs it is covering. It’s not clear state agencies have the means to balance drug cost pressures with the best interests of patients, taxpayers and public health.

Picture of Lisa Pickoff-White

California’s jails were built to hold inmates for relatively short sentences — usually just a few months. But now local law enforcement is grappling with how to hold offenders for long periods of time, which is having an impact on mentally ill inmates.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Many homeless people have severe mental disorders yet remain on the streets for months or even years. The challenge for social service providers and authorities is that these vulnerable and sometimes volatile people often refuse help.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Among Ventura County’s chronically homeless, 37 percent reported a mental illness in the 2015 count. Some officials believe the real percentage is likely higher because the annual survey relies on homeless people self-reporting mental illness, and some may not realize it or don’t want to admit it.

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