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mental health treatment

Picture of Soreath Hok
For those who survived the trauma of the Khmer Rouge genocide, mental health treatment remains a dire need. A program in Oakland is succeeding in reaching Cambodians at risk in this refugee community.
Picture of Soreath Hok
The lack of providers who speak Khmer is cited as one of the factors keeping more Cambodian refugees from receiving treatment.
Picture of Soreath Hok
Forty years after resettlement, this community is still grappling with the aftermath of the Khmer Rouge regime.
Picture of Soreath Hok
Treating their trauma is complex: Language and cultural barriers make it hard for many to access mental health care.
Picture of Richard Lord
In a town kept down by county decisions and indecision, even the most determined families find it hard to rise above stagnation, deprivation, and violence.
Picture of Nick Welsh
For the past three years, Eddie Hsueh has led a lonely uphill charge within the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office to change the way deputies interact with people with mental illness. It starts with training.
Picture of Denisse Salazar
Those who work for Gang Victim Services are on call to detectives 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They often are the first to tell parents their son or daughter is dead.
Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
California spends an estimated $4 to $5 billion a year on mental health services for children and teens. Our goal is to find out whether access to mental health care is equitable across the state, as required by law.
Picture of Nick Welsh
For many families struggling to navigate the maze of available mental-health treatment, the story of Everest Hickey highlights the desperate lengths to which they must go to get needed help.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Community violence and a visit to the doctor might seem unrelated. But for people living in violent communities, and the police who patrol them, it's often more closely related than people think.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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