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For young women in the armed forces to consider suicide – and act on it – is far more common than their civilian peers, a new analysis by Voice of San Diego finds.
Picture of William Huntsberry
An average of more than five Marines per year died by suicide at Camp Pendleton. At least 20 took their lives in the barracks ­– and another four during training exercises.
Picture of William Huntsberry
The suicide crisis among veterans has been well documented. But another dark phenomenon exists just beneath the surface in San Diego and across the country.
Picture of Neda Iranpour

My fellowship project was prompted by a question I’d been wondering about: Might mindfulness be a “prescription” for our health care system? I have heard from countless people who told me how meditating had changed their life. So why is it not more commonly recommended by providers?

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Navy Corpsman 2nd class Jennifer Starks says yoga helped her reintegrate back into the community because she was isolating herself. Starks was diagnosed with PTSD after 12 years in the military, a career that included two deployments and time on a carrier.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Many are baffled why the suicide rate in the United States is rising despite antidepressant use being at an all time high. Suicide has risen to 38,000 a year, says USA Today, after falling in the 1990s.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

It took academic, government and military researchers five years to say they don't really know what is causing military suicides but whatever it is, they say it isn't the psychoactive drugs they are prescribing and pushing.

Announcements

The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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