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mortality rates

Picture of Keith Burbank
This story is the first in a series exploring the deaths of homeless people in Santa Clara County — who the victims were, how they died and what might be done to save the lives of people few may remember.
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. Other stories in the series include:   Black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. My family is part of this statistic   America's black babies are pay
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Mike Hixenbaugh shares how he and Charlie Ornstein exposed the unusually high rate of deaths and complications at one of the country’s best known heart transplant programs.
Picture of Priska Neely
It's one thing to identify the complex social cause of this crisis. It's far harder to combat racism and stop more babies from dying.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
New research finds that among very preterm babies, where they are born matters greatly. And black and Hispanic mothers are more likely to deliver at hospitals with worse outcomes.
Picture of Padma Nagappan
Black women have twice the risk of developing breast cancer as white women, and three times the mortality rate. They also have far less access to screening.
Picture of Paul Sisson

In California, fines up to $125,000 per preventable mistake have not made a significant dent in the number of medical errors. Despite recent gains, the number is still higher than when the state’s program began nine years ago.

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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