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NICU

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Having health insurance is no guarantee American families won't suddenly find themselves financially underwater, as reporter Jacob Margolis recently discovered.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
A recent study finds preemies had 1.6 times the risk of being readmitted to the hospital within their first year for injuries from physical abuse and neglect.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The challenge for journalists covering the country’s unchanged perinatal mortality rate is to go beyond the hospital setting, says Boston University's Eugene Declercq.
Picture of Aviril (Apple) Sepulveda
How OTs who work with children could do more to screen moms for depression and get them help during kids' appointments.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A recently-published Stanford University study found that race influences the quality of care premature babies receive. Though, the lead researcher was clear that the study was not about uncovering racial bias.
Picture of Michael  Hochman

A study looking at births in Britain finds home-births safer, while another U.S. study finds babies born at home face higher risk of death. It turns out having ways to get moms to the hospital quickly when complications arise might be the most important variable.

Picture of Jenny Gold

Anne and Omar Shamiyeh first learned something was wrong with one of their twins during an ultrasound, when Anne was 18 weeks pregnant. "The technician was, like, 'Well, there's no visualization of his stomach,'" Anne recounted. "And I was like, 'How does our baby have no stomach?'"

Picture of Jenny Gold

Technology to care for very sick and premature infants has improved dramatically over the past two decades. But these incredible measures also mean parents and neonatologists in the NICU face complex ethical questions when deciding how much care to provide and when to stop.

Picture of William Heisel

Four words a parent never wants to hear when leaving the hospital: "your baby has MRSA." What went wrong?

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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