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opioid addiction

Picture of Francie Diep
Why don't some addiction treatment centers in California offer medication-assisted treatment or MAT?
Picture of Kerry Klein
The Central Valley's Kern County reported a 30 percent rise in overdose deaths from 2016 to 2017, bucking the statewide decline in fatal overdoses.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
A network of regional "task forces" is tackling the opioid problem throughout California, leading to a dramatic drop in overdoses in one rural mountain county.
Picture of Jill Replogle
Orange County has the second highest number of opioid-related deaths in the state after Los Angeles, and the epidemic is hitting hardest among people in their golden years.
Picture of Amy DePaul

Homelessness is a health crisis, and the clock is ticking. With homeless life expectancy between 42 and 52, and half of the nation's homeless at least 50, it's not surprising that Orange and several other California counties have seen a dramatic rise in homeless deaths in recent years.

Picture of Chinyere Amobi
Reporters Kameel Stanley and Ed Williams discuss ethics in journalism, with a focus on communities in crisis. They emphasize how taking the time to understand a community can lead to more compelling reporting.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
Data journalist Leonardo Castaneda offers reporters a detailed tutorial on how to analyze — and then map — data from any county's medical examiner's office on opioid-related deaths.
Picture of Ryan White
The number of babies born with opioids in their system has risen dramatically in recent years. That's particularly worrying in light of new research that found such children perform significantly worse in school than their peers.
Picture of William Heisel
How do we begin to solve the prescription drug crisis ravaging communities across the country? A recent report points the way to promising solutions, including some that should've been implemented years ago.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
A data-driven look at opioid addiction in San Diego found that old assumptions about addiction hotspots were outdated. Reporter Leo Castaneda shares this and other field lessons he learned along the way.

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