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opioid epidemic

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The opioid epidemic has given rise to an illicit gold rush as patient brokers and treatment centers profit off desperate addicts, funneling them to shoddy treatment centers and fraudulent “sober” homes at a profit of thousands per head.
Picture of Jill Replogle
Orange County has the second highest number of opioid-related deaths in the state after Los Angeles, and the epidemic is hitting hardest among people in their golden years.
Picture of Amy DePaul

Homelessness is a health crisis, and the clock is ticking. With homeless life expectancy between 42 and 52, and half of the nation's homeless at least 50, it's not surprising that Orange and several other California counties have seen a dramatic rise in homeless deaths in recent years.

Picture of Chinyere Amobi
Reporters Kameel Stanley and Ed Williams discuss ethics in journalism, with a focus on communities in crisis. They emphasize how taking the time to understand a community can lead to more compelling reporting.
Picture of Michael Lujan

As drug prices continue to rise, one in four Americans cannot afford to fill their prescriptions. It's a problem that is growing and warrants a closer look at some of the key drivers and possible solutions.

Picture of Giles Bruce
This series was produced as a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include:  Fort Wayne, Ind. mom shares tragic story of losing baby In Indianapolis, a baby dies every 3 1/2 days
Picture of Ed Williams
The story of heroin in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County had been told too many times by the national media, leaving residents wary. But no journalist had invested the time to tell the personal stories of the community.
Picture of Ed Williams
If there’s any police department that understands what an opioid epidemic means for a community, it’s New Mexico's Española Police Department. Even the chief of police has had addiction struggles within his own family.
Picture of Ryan White
New statistics show just how quickly rates of babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome have risen over the past six years, particularly in largely rural states such as Kentucky. Here's why that's so worrying.
Picture of Ed Williams

America’s opioid epidemic has exploded in recent years. But the community of Española in northern New Mexico has long had one of the highest rate of opioid overdoses in the country.

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