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police brutality

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How police officers handle an escalating situation caused by a mental health crisis can make a big difference in the outcome. Kayleigh's story may explain why.
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Why we need to distinguish between bad behavior and structural problems in how we’re organized as a society.
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Public officials come under fire for budgets that prioritize law enforcement and shortchange community health and safety.
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A reporter reflects on the deeper issues behind a split-second decision she faced on air when asked for her reaction to George Floyd's death.
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How journalists of color can practice self-care, stay safe and advocate for fair coverage in their newsrooms.

Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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