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preventative care

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The Trump administration’s new public charge rule could discourage immigrants from accessing everything from emergency services to free flu shots, health experts warn.
Picture of Susan  Abram
Emergency departments at three hospitals stood out in all of California as the ones that were the most visited in 2016. They couldn’t be more different.
Picture of Monica Velez
For years Merced County has struggled to convince doctors to come live and work in the rural, impoverished Central Valley community, resulting in a ratio of about 45 doctors for every 100,000 residents.
Picture of Monica Velez
Horisons Unlimited Health Care filed for bankruptcy and closed all eight of its clinics, including five in Merced County. About 80 percent of Horisons patients were on Medi-Cal.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
Access to medical care in all of America’s inner cities is a pressing need, particularly in light of possible drastic changes to Medicare and Medicaid.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The U.S. needs to seriously examine what the national health systems of peer countries like France, Germany, and the U.K. do best and make those ideas work here.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Parents of undocumented children who qualify for California’s Medicaid program have asked to be unenrolled or have their information scrubbed from databases.
Picture of Monica Velez
In California’s Merced County, residents are more likely to be exposed to tobacco, suffer from poor air quality, or die of heart disease. At the same time, the region faces a long-running shortage of doctors.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
Can a revamped community hospital overcome a history of dysfunction and place residents of South Los Angeles on a path to better health and lower rates of chronic disease?
Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno
A sizable percentage of California farmworkers are still struggling to get access to health services for themselves and their families.

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