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reporting lessons

Picture of Sara Satullo
"The response to the series was unlike anything I’ve seen in nearly 16 years as a professional journalist," writes the author.
Picture of Sonja Sharp
Modern obstetrics has largely turned its back on the large and growing number of disabled women who get pregnant.
Picture of Genoa Barrow
In Sacramento, a reporter finds the Black community tired of being ignored, tired of not having its needs met, and tired of dying.
Picture of Sarah Klearman
Engaged journalism helped me see the whole of these men and women. And, just as I wanted to listen, many were willing to talk.
Picture of Giles Bruce
LA Times reporter Marissa Evans shares tips for mining public records — and you don’t have to be a geek to do it.
Picture of Shannon Firth
How do you reach a socially isolated group of older adults who might not have the online presence we expect of younger people?
Picture of Nathan O'Neal
Reporters recount the constant struggle to balance in-person interviews with efforts to protect themselves and others from the coronavirus.
Picture of Nicole Karlis
Hard-earned tips on how to stay nimble when current events supplant your grand reporting plans.
Picture of Paulina Velasco
Are our identities and backgrounds liabilities or strengths in journalism? A reporter shares her takeaways from interviewing immigration advocates.
Picture of William Heisel
"The problem was, I was being played," writes contributor Bill Heisel. "The giant petrochemical company, Arco, had the city of Butte and the state of Montana outmatched."

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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