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Picture of Liz Owens
Employees within the Richmond County School System tell the I-TEAM say it's chaos behind the scenes when it comes to enrolling homeless and vulnerable students missing permanent addresses and transportation to school.
Picture of Liz Owens
The reporting team uncovered nearly 3,000 students in the Richmond County School System are unaccounted for this school year.
Picture of Alex Stuckey
A Houston Chronicle investigation found that at no point since 2013 did any Texas school district have the nationally or state recommended student-to-provider ratios in four positions that are key to providing mental health support for children — nurses, counselors, case workers and psychologists.
Picture of Alex Stuckey
There are only eight kids in this class at Linda Tutt Learning Center, but the chaos erupting throughout the room and spilling into the hallway would set any teacher on edge.
Picture of Stephanie Lamm
But at no point since 2013 did any Texas school district have the professionally recommended student supervisor ratios for counselors, nurses, psychologist and social workers at the same time, a Houston Chronicle investigation found.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
As schools have returned to in-person instruction, advocates for children say they’re starting to see an uptick in juvenile justice complaints. We look at how diversion works in other countries.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
Juvenile justice advocates see a disproportionate number of children with reading disabilities. The pandemic shed a light on those inequities.
Picture of Liz Owens
After an I-TEAM investigation and a recent supplemental grant from the state, the Richmond County Board of Education agreed to provide additional funds to address the growing needs among homeless students and the record number of teens missing from the classroom.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
School-based juvenile justice complaints decreased when children were not in school during the pandemic, but what about now?
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
When schools shut down at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, juvenile delinquency complaints decreased. Here’s what it means — and what it doesn’t.

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